Category: Anti-aging


Botox: Might Be Good for Curing the Blues

40s BotoxDepression may be improved with the use of Botox, according to a report in The New York Times, March 23, 2014 edition. Since Botox can prevent frowning and unhappy facial expression, it was theorized that if you can’t frown it may be harder to be depressed. Researchers wanted to study the idea that facial expressions may feed information back to our brains that influence our mood.

74 patients with major depression received injections in the forehead muscles responsible for frowning. The shots were randomized to either Botox or a salt water solution, placebo. Six weeks later 52% of those who received Botox showed improvement in their depression, as compared to only 15% of those with the salt water injections.

Only half of those in the Botox group were correct in guessing that they had received Botox, which is no better than the toss of the coin. Presumably, knowledge of receiving the Botox could not influence emotional response.

Botox for depression is part of a tradition of “Outside In” therapies that aim to improve the psyche by external manipulations. Acupuncture treatment of anxiety, and exercise for the production of endorphins are other examples of successful use of this methodology. Light therapy sends signals to the brain that can effectively counter Seasonal Affective Disorder. We all recognize that when we look better we have a better sense of self esteem. The concept rings true.

It will take more science to show whether Botox is an effective treatment for depression, and which types of depression it works best for. In the meantime, if you are getting Botox to look a little better, pay attention to whether the absence of frowns puts you in a better frame of mind!

Anti-aging, Beauty, Doctor-Patient Relationship, Facelift, Personal Fitness, Skin Care

JUVEDERM VOLUMA XC: The New Injectable for Improving Cheek and Midface Contour

Juvederm VolumaThe 2013 calendar year saw a whopping increase of 18% in the number of people seeking injectable fillers to smooth wrinkles and enhance contours of the face. There were 1.7 million injection sessions of hyaluronic acid, a naturally occurring substance in all human tissues. The filler contains a numbing agent, lidocaine, so the injection is only a minor discomfort.

Voluma is a  new product developed to be thicker than its cousin Juvederm so it lasts longer.  It is intended to fill in the cheekbones and chin when these start to lose fullness. The FDA approved its availability to Plastic Surgeons in the final quarter of last year and it is becoming readily available.

As the face loses volume and skin begins to lose its elasticity, the cheek bone region flattens and folds of skin develop in the lower cheek from nose to mouth. None of us like it. With Juvederm, the injection is placed into the creases to camouflage the skin relaxing as the volume goes away. With Voluma, the injection is placed in the mid cheek, elevating the nasolabial skin folds to their natural position. With the skilled hands of a Board Certified Plastic Surgeon it can give an immediate improvement in fullness.

Voluma has been used extensively in Europe, Latin America, Canada, the Middle East and Asia since its introduction in 2005. It is finally available here in the US.

Voluma can last up to two years, whereas Juvederm has an average duration of six months. Longer lasting—wouldn’t that be nice? For a low maintenance product and no more upkeep than your skin care routine, you can experience improved facial fullness for up to two years!

Anti-aging, Beauty, Doctor-Patient Relationship, Facelift, Fat Transfer / Fat Grafting, Skin Care

The New Breed of Holistic Workout

HealthClubTreadmillsArianna Huffington recently wrote a great article on how exercising (at American health clubs in particular) has become something to dread. Gyms have become a place we drag ourselves to, pay a hefty monthly fee for, and stare at a TV as we clock the obligatory 30-60 minutes/day.

She writes,

“The benefits of making our bodies fitter are deeply connected to the fitness of our inner selves, but gyms make it hard to feel that connection. They don’t allow for the kind of solitude and mindfulness that we can get communing with nature on an outdoor run. And, overly muscled pickups aside, they aren’t very conducive to making any real social connection. A person watching her own screen while walking on a treadmill next to another person watching another screen while walking on a treadmill is like a metaphor for our modern life. It’s what we do at work, at home and at the gym.”

I too find the gym is not conducive to mindfulness, and am more and more conscious that what I am motivated by most, is working out in a social context-with friends or family or the people I work with. I’d rather take a class, or go for a bike ride or a hike and share the endorphin rush with great people, than spend spare hours I don’t have on a treadmill.

Ariana references The Guardian‘s Nicole Mowbray, who wrote recently about the growing trend of the “calm workout,” or “a new breed of holistic workout that promises to care for your head as well as your heart” as she describes it. For example, there’s Psycle, which offers spinning classes in rooms with low lights and calming music and features a “free time” break during the class. 

“The philosophy is supposedly inspired by the belief that ‘your state of mind is key to how often and how hard you exercise.’ There’s also CardioLates, which combines spin and Pilates; Third Space, which offers the services of ‘wellness doctors’; and Spynga, which is part spin, part yoga.

These workouts are part of a trend driven by the understanding that getting fit doesn’t have to be so unpleasant. And it’s pretty simple to see that if we make exercise a more inviting and more rewarding experience, we’ll do it more often. If we’re going to redefine success to include well-being, we also need to redefine getting in shape to include mental and soul fitness.”

View Huffington link

Anti-aging, Exercise, Personal Fitness, Uncategorized, Weight loss

Want To Be a Better Version of You?

Accept the Challenge in 2014 

Walk ParkWonder diets and quick weight loss plans get a lot of attention with the start of each New Year. I suggest skipping extreme solutions. Dropping 20 lb. and gaining it right back is not success. The real path to your best health, vitality and weight control requires commitment to a lifestyle that is practical. Here are a few practical suggestions for sustainable health and fitness improvements:

  1. Diet without counting calories. It is too much trouble to weigh and measure every bite of food you put in your mouth. Use portion control and avoid calorie dense foods.
  2. Hit your goal 80% of the time. If you are a perfectionist you will be disabled by your disappointment. Perfect is definitely not practical. So allow yourself some margin.
  3. Keep a journal so you are accountable and honest with yourself.
  4. Drink 11-12 glasses of water a day to combat hunger and fill your stomach.
  5. Keep moving!! You have to move to lose weight and exercise is a good to fight anxiety and depression. 
  6. Weigh weekly to avoid weight drift.
  7. Your weekly exercise routine should include 30 minutes of cardio a least 3 times and resistance training 2-3 times. Find exercise you like doing. Make your exercise social. Exercise with a friend to accomplish two important functions at once.

A sound body requires a sound mind. Learning methods for managing stress and building resilience are important for the sustainability of your challenge. Most women are so accustomed to being caretakers, they neglect their own needs, both physical and psychological. Make time for your mental and physical well being.   

Announcements, Anti-aging, Body Contouring, Doctor-Patient Relationship, Exercise, Nutrition, Personal Fitness, Weight loss

Combining an International “Vacation” with Plastic Surgery: Is Price More Important than Quality?

Womaninhammock“Medical tourism” is a modern reality. It is estimated that there may be as many as 15 million Americans a year receiving some form of care outside of the country. Those that are seeking plastic surgery are lured by combining their desire for cosmetic improvement with their desire for a vacation abroad. The consumer that puts a premium on cost over quality may not be aware of what they are giving up.

Here are some points to consider before booking the trip:

  1. What are the qualifications of the person performing your surgery abroad?  Does the country have any regulation of who is allowed to perform cosmetic surgery?
  2. Will a language barrier make it difficult to communicate with your caregivers, about your medical history, your informed consent, and your after care instructions? Will they know all they need to know about you and will you learn what you need to know from them?
  3. How can you verify the safety and sterility of the operating room where your surgery will take place? The United States has high, likely the strictest standards, for accrediting its medical facilities.
  4. Recovery from surgery is usually a time where rest is needed to heal. Fatigue is likely to interfere with the “vacation” part of the trip.
  5. Who will take care of potential complications? What if you need care beyond the time allotted for the trip?
  6. If the result is unsatisfactory who will revise your surgery? Will you have any follow up?

The American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery has a set of guidelines for those consider international plastic surgery. You can access this checklist here.

Anti-aging, Beauty, Body Contouring, Breast Augmentation, Breast Implants, Discount cosmetic surgery, Doctor-Patient Relationship, Mommy Makeover

South Korea: The World’s Capital for Plastic Surgery

Korean Plastic Surgery FaceI  just returned from a week in Seoul S. Korea, visiting with a manufacturer of US medical devices. This first time visit to Korea was eye opening. My pre-conceived images of Korea, probably formed by watching re-runs of MASH, were of a struggling people recovering from the ravages of Japanese occupation and the Korean Civil War. They have reversed the sufferings of the last century. Seoul is now a sophisticated metropolis, ringing with commerce and populated with meticulously dressed urbanites, rushing from offices, restaurants, karaoke bars, health clubs and university classrooms. South Korea has made an astonishing move from shanty-town poverty into a modern high rise industrialized economy in a span of 50 years. 

Of particular interest to me was the Korean attention to beauty. They dress stylishly, pay careful attention to grooming and consider looks to be an important element to success. This value allows them to be very open to plastic surgery as a means of achieving their ideals.

South Korea has the world’s highest per capita rate of cosmetic plastic surgery, according to the 2009 and 2011 statistics of the International Society of  Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons. 

For Korean college graduates seeking employment, 27.4% get plastic surgery to fare better in the hyper-competitive job market. Every year 74 out of every 10,000 people undergo cosmetic surgery, a rate 1.8 times the United States. One in five women between the ages of 20 and 45 is reported to have cosmetic surgery. 

Korea is followed by Greece, Italy and the United States in the per capita rate of choosing plastic surgery. The people of Brazil and Taiwan also value and utilize plastic surgery with a high degree of frequency.

The Asian specialized procedures that are performed frequently in Korea include the double eyelid surgery to make the eyes appear larger, cheek implants to create an “apple” shape, jaw contouring to decrease the width of the face and rhinoplasty to raise the height of the nose.  Forehead shaping with fat grafts, liposuction and breast implants are also popular. 

For more information consult:

International Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons, www.isaps.org

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/01/31/top-plastic-surgery-countries-world_n_2590757.html

Anti-aging, Beauty, Blepharoplasty, Doctor-Patient Relationship, Fat Transfer / Fat Grafting, Rhinoplasty, Skin Care

Plastic Surgery after Bariatric Surgery Shown to Improve Long Term Weight Control

Weight lossBeing massively overweight is associated with poor body image, low self-esteem and reduced health related quality of life. In the United States, over 100,000 bariatric surgeries are performed annually to address these health concerns. Gastric bypass, the most frequently performed weight loss procedure, allows rapid weight loss in the first 18 months. However, half of these people gradually regain 10-15 % of the lost weight over the next 10 years. Those regained pounds undo some of the improvements the bariatric surgery brought. A new study reported out of Geneva Switzerland shows that those who have body contouring plastic surgery for the excess skin after massive weight loss are more successful at keeping the weight off for the long haul.

A group of patients who had undergone gastric bypass surgery between the years of 1999 and 2007 were compared for their ability to keep the weight off. Average weight loss was an impressive 99 lb. With a follow up of seven years, the 102 people who had not chosen to have plastic surgery to get rid of the deflated skin had regained an average of 50 lb. However the 98 people who chose body contouring plastic surgery to complete the process after their bariatric surgery only regained an average of 13 lb. over the seven year period.

The authors conclude that bariatric plastic surgery is crucial for successful treatment of morbid obesity. The plastic surgery improves psychosocial functioning and strengthens long term weight loss maintenance.

www.PRSJournal.com, October 2013

Anti-aging, Body Contouring, Doctor-Patient Relationship, Mommy Makeover, Nutrition, Personal Fitness, Uncategorized, Weight loss

Asian Eyelid Surgery

AsianWomancropSeattle has a large Asian population of varying ethnicities. I find they express different preferences for beauty in the upper eyelid. Those from Chinese, Japanese or Korean heritage more often favor a narrow crease above the eyelashes. Filipinos, Taiwanese, Malaysians and Indonesians prefer a wider fold. Population genetics show that the narrow or no crease peoples were originally from Northern Mongolia in prehistoric times. The Southern Mongolians evolved different facial features including deep set eyes and a wider crease. Most people want to retain a natural look that is true to their familial background.

The “classic” Asian eye

  1. Slants upward on the outer corner
  2. Has an absent lid crease,
  3. Has a fold of skin that lies over the inner corner, referred to as an epicanthal fold

In reality, the Asian eyelid has a large range of individual variation, including the height of the crease, the width of the eyelid opening, the amount of fat around the lids, and the shape of the eye.

It is possible to vary the blepharoplasty procedure according to each person’s preferences, especially when it comes to the desired fold height. You will want to talk about that when you come in for a consultation. You can make aesthetic changes without  erasing your heritage. A “natural” look is better than a “westernized” look. 

Anti-aging, Beauty, Blepharoplasty, Fat Transfer / Fat Grafting, Skin Care, Uncategorized

Top 5 Cosmetic Procedures for Men

HandsomeManMen in the prime of their life are seeking cosmetic surgery for both personal and professional reasons. In July, the Cosmetic Surgery National Data Bank released its statistics for 2012. It is interesting to see what plastic surgeries men select. Men had nearly 1 million cosmetic procedures in the US, 10% of the total. The winners are listed with the number of reported cases.

  1. Liposuction (41,642)
  2. Rhinoplasty, nose reshaping (29,996)
  3. Blepharoplasty, cosmetic eye lid surgery (23,251)
  4. Gynecomastia, reduction of male breasts (22,736)
  5. Otoplasty, correction of prominent ears (12,053)

The data collection for plastic surgery goes back to 1997. The number of procedures for men has more than doubled since that time. Men are also seeking nonsurgical cosmetic procedures, such as Botox injections in rapidly increasing numbers. There were 808,011 nonsurgical cosmetic procedures reported to have been performed on men in the United States during 2012 according to the American Society for Aesthetic Surgery.

www.surgery.org

Aesthetic Surgery Journal, vol. 33, Supplement 2, July 2013.

Anti-aging, Beauty, Blepharoplasty, Body Contouring, Gynecomastia, Male Breast Enlargement, Male Breast Reduction, Personal Fitness

Current Trends Show Fat Grafting the Breast Is Popular

Breast Fat TransferA recent survey of board certified Plastic Surgeons confirms that plastic surgeons are using fat transfer with increasing frequency and success.
80% reported using fat in parts of the body other than breast.
70 % actively perform fat grafting to the breast.
62% used fat transfer as a good choice for improving breast shape and
contour in reconstructive breast surgeries.
28% of the surveyed surgeons employ this technique for cosmetic purposes.

 

 

Here are some of the ways this valuable technique is being used:

  1. Breast implants in thin women can show wrinkling or visible borders. Fat can provide a thicker soft tissue cover to hide implant characteristics.
  2. Fat grafts can cover prominent ribs or an irregular chest wall.
  3. Congenital breast problems, such as tubular breasts or lack of growth of one breast can be reshaped with fat transfer as part of the procedure.
  4. In breast reconstruction after mastectomy, fat can help camouflage the borders of an implant, or fill in a deficit in a flap contour or after a lumpectomy defect. Fat can treat irradiated tissue and seems to improve skin quality. 

There were nearly 72,000 fat grafting procedures reported by US board certified surgeons for 2012, according to the American Society for Aesthetic Surgery. 

For more detail visit the July 2013 issue if Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, www.PRSJournal.com.

Anti-aging, Blepharoplasty, Body Contouring, Breast Augmentation, Breast health, Breast Implants, Breast Reduction, Fat Transfer / Fat Grafting, Mommy Makeover, Tubular Breasts

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